Thursday, August 4, 2011

Crazy 3x3x3 Jupiter - CC Last

The Crazy 3x3x3 Jupiter is one of the "Crazy Planet Cube" series. I'll be solving using a Circle Corners Last approach. It's assumed you can solve a 3x3x3 Rubik's cube.


Understanding Crazy 3x3x3 Jupiter


First, take a look at the diagram below.





You'll see that Jupiter is listed as "0", and on the picture, the white face is different to the other 5 faces. The "0" means that when you turn the white face, the center parts do not turn with the face. When you turn the other faces, the center parts do move. So they're "1" faces.


But yours may have a different colour as the "0" face. (Apparently the factory just puts them together with the correct face specification regardless of colour.) It's a good idea to make yours the same colour specifications as the original. This site will be using the correct colours. This video will show you how.


Note: The video is for earth, but the procedure is the same.




The Basic Plot
  1. Solve outer edges
  2. Solve outer corners
  3. Solve inner edges
  4. Solve inner corners (circle corners)


Step 1: Outer Edges


Do this exactly as you would for a standard Rubik's cube, using the edge piece series.





Step 2: Outer Corners


Do this exactly as you would for a standard Rubik's cube, using the corner piece series.




Step 3: Solve Inner Edges

Now that the outer corners and edges are done, it's time to solve the inner edges. To cycle inner edges, hold the cube with the white face at the front.

Here's what to do:
  1. Corner piece series first turn of upper face clockwise but using middle slice instead of left
  2. Turn cube 180° about vertical axis and then turn slice between up and down face 90° anticlockwise
  3. Corner piece series first turn of upper face anticlockwise but using middle slice instead of right
  4. Turn slice between up and down face 90° clockwise and turn cube 180°
Although this may seem difficult, it's quite simple in practice. 

That procedure cycles the three inner edges from UB -> UF -> FR. That means the piece in the up-back position will move to the up-front position, which will move to the front-right position.

Using the above, we cycle our inner edges until all are solved. The video below will give you a good idea of how to do it.



Step 4: Solve Inner Corners


To cycle inner corners, hold the cube with the white face at the front.


Here's what to do:
  1. Corner piece series first turn of upper face clockwise
  2. Turn the whole cube clockwise about the vertical axis
  3. Corner piece series first turn of upper face anticlockwise
This procedure cycles the three inner corners from LUB -> LUF -> UBR. That means the piece on the left face (in the up-back position) will move to the left face (in the up-front position), which will move to the up face (in the back-right position).


Using the above, we cycle our inner corners pieces (potentially 24 of them) until all are solved. Initially it's quick and easy. It's often possible to cycle 2 at a time, and occasionally, all 3. As there are less pieces to cycle, it becomes harder. When you're down to the last 5 or so, it can often be difficult to setup the pieces and keep track of what you did. The video below will give you a good idea of how to do it.



And a final video showing the endgame.





And that's it. Your Crazy 3x3x3 Jupiter is now solved. I trust this site has been helpful. If you have any questions or want some clarifications, please use the comments to do so.





6 comments:

  1. Awesome! I am glad to see that even you struggle to remember the setup moves and have to write them down!

    How did you find the sequences that allowed the inner pieces to cycle without upsetting the outer pieces? I can see that they are just corner piece cycles but also they needed to be combined and it is not clear how you discovered them. Maybe another blog post detailing how you go about investigating a new cube?

    Kevin
    PuzzleMad

    PS How about dating the posts so we can see how your techniques developed over time?

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    Replies
    1. @Kevin

      First, thanks. I do try and make my videos as natural as possible. That means that almost all the time there's no editing. Extremely occasionally I'll splice a couple together. But I think it needs to be as natural as possible, which is why sometimes I struggle to remember setups!

      How I find the sequences is lots of time spent experimenting. Trying this, that and the other until something works. It's not completely random, it's more educated trialling.

      In the jupiter inner corners example, I would have tried doing CPS with the white face in different places. When I tried it in front, I saw that the corners had cycled as normal. But then, if you turn the cube clockwise, you then have the pieces in the "anticlockwise CPS" position. That would have led me to try doing the anticlockwise CPS to see what might happen. And while it returned the outer corners, the inner corners were not all returned.

      And as for dating the posts, they are: blogger automatically gives posts a url with the date. So this one has 2011/08 in it.

      Delete
    2. I hadn't looked at the URL! Doh!
      I had been looking on the page somewhere - at the bottom of each post the time of posting is noted but not the date! I think you can set the date to come up in the settings under language and formatting and choose a date header format.

      Delete
    3. Now it's my turn: DOH!

      I hadn't seen this. I've changed the date formatting now...

      Delete
  2. Im trying to solve this cube now, i try to find your site at rubiksultimatesolution.blogspot.com, almost got freaked i didn't find it :-)

    What method should i start with (easier) , this one or the "edge last" ?

    Thanks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi aviron

      Sorry for the confusion. I changed the site name and url, but unfortunately I also needed to go back through 700 videos and change the reference in each of them. I haven't managed to do them all yet.

      I would definitely begin with the "Reduction" method for crazy jupiter. It's much more fun and much more intuitive.,

      Delete